7 Key Business Drivers for Assessing the Security of Your IT Environment

Key Business Drivers for Asseing Security of Your IT Environment

For Assessing the Security of your IT Environment:

  • What you don’t know could hurt you.
  • A data breach could cost you your business.
  • Unplanned downtime is never forgotten.
  • Trust is hard to build and easy to lose.
  • Assessments extend budget.
  • It is not a matter of if but when a security incident will occur.
  • What gets measured, gets done.

DRaaS: Everything You Need to Know

How is your security posture measured?

With today’s security landscape, it is critical to identify, understand and measure the effectiveness of your data security and recovery strategies. Vulnerability assessments play a critical role in protecting your data environment.  These drivers have significant influence and can impact the overall success of your business.

  • What you don’t know could hurt you.

Assessments, when performed appropriately are designed to uncover hidden issues.  DSM’s team of experts has performed many assessments, often identifying issues vital to the security of an organization’s data. Discovering a problem, determining a resolution and remedying the issue before it becomes critical provides immense value to your company.

Research has determined that 1 in 5 employees will open a suspicious email and ½ will click on an attachment.  Accordingly, the human factor is still your biggest weakness.  Security awareness training must be part of the business strategy to mitigate against targeted email attacks.

  • A data breach could cost you your business.

SafeNet stated data breaches have a significant impact on whether a customer will interact with an organization again.  Cyber Risk Insurance may help offset financial loss after a Security Breach; nevertheless, your clients may not be very forgiving and choose another vendor.

While there is no perfect solution for preventing a malicious attack, a business with a documented risk management plan will help protect a business from losing valued clients.

  • Unplanned downtime is never forgotten.

IDC found that 71% of U.S. businesses in a recent survey experienced less than 10 hours of downtime per year. While that may not sound like a lot, the implications in terms of financial impact can be significant. Accordingly, the financial impact ranges from $125,000 for the SMB to as much as $17 million for the enterprise.

If you have been in IT for very long, you know that nobody remembers the 365 days of uptime, but will always remember the outage regardless of who was at fault.

  • Trust is hard to build and easy to lose.

A good analogy for trust is the use of a debit card.  You have to make some deposits before you make withdrawals.  Trust is no different it requires an ongoing effort to maintain.  Many businesses today focus on new revenue, while often putting their long- term clients on the back burner.

Communicating regularly with clients both old and new will not only build goodwill, but will also pay dividends in the long run should an issue ever arise with your valued clients.

  • Assessments extend budget.

One major benefit of network and computer assessments is the release of funds.  DSM has observed over the years that assessments often influence IT spending. History has proven that an IT department can recommend various technologies that may get ignored due to budget constraints until an auditor makes a similar recommendation.

A third party observation adds additional merit and often uncovers opportunities for improvements.  With today’s security landscape, organizations need a higher percentage of spending to cover the ever-growing threats.

  • It is not a matter of if but when a security incident will occur.

Statistics show that security incidents happen in most every environment.  These incidents range from a simple virus to a more severe data breach.  Your business strategy must incorporate a more comprehensive security plan.  Knowing that a plan is needed, an audit can help identify the layers of protection required to protect your IT environment.

Computer security assessments will not only help identify gaps in current solutions, it will also ultimately assist the organization in establishing a comprehensive long-term security maintenance plan.

  • What gets measured, gets done; who is measuring your security posture?

One of the trends that DSM has noticed in many assessments is the lack of controls in place to ensure policies are being enforced. Past audits validate that critical tasks can and will often be overlooked.  Two critical components that are often missed are patching and following best practices for backups.

Patch Management is a common term that most organizations have embraced; however, large percentages of workstations and servers are often unnoticed.  Many IT assessments reveal that system backups often exclude systems files thus making a full recovery more difficult.  Selecting data to backup may save disk space, nevertheless critical files can be skipped.

If you are looking to strengthen your security posture, or need to start a Security Management Plan, please call 863-802-8888 or visit www.dsm.net.

7 Key Business Drivers for Assessing the Security of Your IT Environment

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